Path of the Righteous Crane - The Life & Legacy of Eu Tong Sen (Softcover Book)

Item No. 9789814189279

Path of the Righteous Crane - The Life & Legacy of Eu Tong Sen (Softcover Book)

9789814189279 - 217 Pages
4.7 out of 5 Customer Rating
US$19.90 US$29.90

The name of Eu Tong Sen is well known in Malaysia, Singapore and Hong Kong. Yet to date, there has been little of substance written about the man; much of what there is, has drawn from a deep well of unsubstantiated folklore.

Ilsa Sharp's account of Eu Tong Sen’s life, based on voluminous research by academic Maria Yang Tse-oy, has theatre aplenty, from mystic feng shui mountains and murder by poison, through dare-devil jungle trekking to fending off revolutionaries, taking on the opium establishment, playing political games with colonial masters,  consorting with opera stars, racehorses, flashy cars and women (11 wives), building stately palaces and castles, and above all, the amassing of enormous personal wealth, a respectable part of which went to family, friends and needy causes, from schools to hospitals.

Yet, this is no ordinary tale of a towkay who just struck it rich. Eu Tong Sen stands tall as a man of his age, and also ours, signalling a future ‘Renaissance Chinese’ character that would combine the best of many worlds and so produce something quite new. In this, Eu Tong Sen was a man well before his time. His life was not a footnote to the period of history he lived in; it was an integral part of the main narrative of the lives of the people who called themselves hua qiao, the Overseas Chinese.


Reviews

  • bvseo_sdk, dw_cartridge, 18.2.0, p_sdk_3.2.0
  • CLOUD, getReviews, 16ms
  • reviews, product
  • bvseo-msg: Unsuccessful GET. status = 'ERROR', msg = 'Not Found.'; Unsuccessful GET. status = 'ERROR', msg = 'Not Found.';

Questions

  • bvseo_sdk, dw_cartridge, 18.2.0, p_sdk_3.2.0
  • CLOUD, getContent, 187ms
  • questions, product
  • bvseo-msg: Unsuccessful GET. status = 'ERROR', msg = 'Not Found.';

The name of Eu Tong Sen is well known in Malaysia, Singapore and Hong Kong. Yet to date, there has been little of substance written about the man; much of what there is, has drawn from a deep well of unsubstantiated folklore.

Ilsa Sharp's account of Eu Tong Sen’s life, based on voluminous research by academic Maria Yang Tse-oy, has theatre aplenty, from mystic feng shui mountains and murder by poison, through dare-devil jungle trekking to fending off revolutionaries, taking on the opium establishment, playing political games with colonial masters,  consorting with opera stars, racehorses, flashy cars and women (11 wives), building stately palaces and castles, and above all, the amassing of enormous personal wealth, a respectable part of which went to family, friends and needy causes, from schools to hospitals.

Yet, this is no ordinary tale of a towkay who just struck it rich. Eu Tong Sen stands tall as a man of his age, and also ours, signalling a future ‘Renaissance Chinese’ character that would combine the best of many worlds and so produce something quite new. In this, Eu Tong Sen was a man well before his time. His life was not a footnote to the period of history he lived in; it was an integral part of the main narrative of the lives of the people who called themselves hua qiao, the Overseas Chinese.


Reviews

  • bvseo_sdk, dw_cartridge, 18.2.0, p_sdk_3.2.0
  • CLOUD, getReviews, 16ms
  • reviews, product
  • bvseo-msg: Unsuccessful GET. status = 'ERROR', msg = 'Not Found.'; Unsuccessful GET. status = 'ERROR', msg = 'Not Found.';

Questions

  • bvseo_sdk, dw_cartridge, 18.2.0, p_sdk_3.2.0
  • CLOUD, getContent, 187ms
  • questions, product
  • bvseo-msg: Unsuccessful GET. status = 'ERROR', msg = 'Not Found.';

This is no ordinary tale of a towkay who just struck it rich. Eu Tong Sen stands tall as a man of his age, and also ours, signalling a future ‘Renaissance Chinese’ character that would combine the best of many worlds and so produce something quite new.

Uncover the extraordinary and dramatic life of this man who has 11 wives, built stately palaces and castles and had enormous personal wealth. There is theatre aplenty in his story, from mystic feng shui mountains and murder by poison, through dare-devil jungle trekking to managing revolutionaries, fighting the opium establishment, playing political games with colonial masters, opera stars, racehorses and flashy cars.

In this, Eu Tong Sen was a man well before his time. His life was not a footnote to the period of history he lived in; it was an integral part of the main narrative of the lives of the people who called themselves hua qiao, the Overseas Chinese.  His story was a story of survival in a colonial age.